Homeschooling: It's not what we do, it's how we live.

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Summertime 2014

If all summers have a theme, then this summer’s theme is probably ‘All Work and No Play’. Sure, we’ve managed to have some fun, but we’ve been even more busy than usual, and it’s been taking a toll. So July is pretty much our ‘sit back and relax’ month. We’re taking a break from all things ‘school-ish’ to focus on connectivity and communication.

That may seem like an odd thing to focus on, but I have found that as my children get older, there have been a few times where things have gotten imbalanced and we’ve had to bring things back to center. Right now, it’s a matter of some martyr-mothering, pre-teen angst and hormones, and a lack of structure.

I started working with our local produce co-op a few months ago, which cuts significantly into our work-week. Between that, our normal summertime endeavors and distractions, and the other things I involve myself in, I’ve allowed our school schedule to slip onto the back burner. So I am giving us a few weeks to sort of relax, then we’ll start back on a daily schedule in a few weeks. I actually planned for us to take a break this summer, which I haven’t done in the past, but we were slacking a bit before our scheduled break, so we’re still ‘off’.

I know, I know… there’s no such thing as ‘off’ in homeschooling. Progress is still being made, even if it’s not quantifiable and all that jazz – but there’s still part of me that has a schedule and it bugs me to get off of it. Not enough to complain about it more than this, but there you have it.

I thought I’d share some of what we’ve been up to lately. The kids are getting so big, and our homeschooling world has changed a lot since those first few months. They were so young when we started, and now they’re both in middle school! August is ‘not back to school’ month, so I am planning on linking up with iHomeschool Network’s NBTS Blog Hop and updating with their calendar again – we’ll have picture week, curriculum week, school space week and ‘day in the life’.

I last posted in April, so it’s definitely been a while. Our state fair falls in April now, thanks to hurricane season – it used to fall in October, which was nice because the weather (sometimes) was slightly cooler, but April isn’t so bad. The boys ran their first 5K; our first as a family, at the Mud Run (hence, the matching tee shirts). My time this year was 90:51:00 (or 1:30:51). Last year it was 1:19:56; but that’s okay because Loverly Husband and I hung back with LBB (who was more interested in it being a stroll through the mud than ‘racing’). In any case, I am super proud of my boys for doing it! The Mud Run fell between my birthday and my sister’s, so we’ve run for the last 2 years as kind of a birthday thing. One of the kids’ friends shares my birthday, so we had an all-out birthday bash team. It was fun!

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One of the trips our homeschool takes each year is through Neches Riverboat Adventures, which is an outdoor lab that studies the water. The drinking water in our city comes from the Neches River, so the students get to work with other departments (Coastal & Marine, TX Parks & Wildlife, Fish & Game, and others) to do experiments on the boat.

 

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We had the opportunity to work with the Texas General Land Office for Adopt-A-Beach again this year. We went to the same location we’ve been to in years past and it’s great to see the progress they’re making on bringing the park back to where it was before the hurricanes took their toll. People think that Hurricane Rita and Hurricane Ike were so long ago, and they were, but there are so many places in our area that still haven’t fully recovered from the damage they wrought. Sea Rim State Park was completely destroyed. It used to have boardwalks through the marshland, a 3-story visitor’s center with showers and an observation deck, and a lovely pier across the marsh from the center to the beach. They have restored (rebuilt) the main pier, and have poured some concrete for the parking areas, but there’s still a long way to go.

Even though the park is a shadow of the grandeur it once held, it’s still a hot-spot for visitors, and the state of the beach proved that. In addition to what visitors left behind, there was a ton of trash and debris washed up on the shores. We cleaned over a mile of beachfront with our team!

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The mysterious, deeply embedded rope. No one was able to pull it out!

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The boys with their dad, fencing with the pick-up sticks.

Another really cool field trip that we got to go on was to the Ocean Star Offshore Platform Museum in Galveston. It’s a retired ‘jack-up’ platform oil rig that’s been converted into a teaching facility. They have a really in-depth look at the oil industry, and of the different types of careers that are associated with it. There were a ton of model ships and oil rig platforms of all kinds for the kids to get up close to see. The actual drill and drill tower are still in tact on the deck, and we got to go right up to them to see how truly massive the pipes and bits are. It was really interesting! Of course, listening to a couple of hours of touting the amazingness of the oil industry got a little bit old, and prompted many discussions over the next few weeks about laternative energy sources and clean energy, but to truly make changes, you have to know what’s in place. Also, we live in Southeast Texas. Our economy is based on the oil industry, so if my kids follow their chosen career tracks, chances are they will end up working in it anyway.

CAM00411We go to Moody Gardens every year with our homeschool group, and this year’s trip was no exception to the fun! We spent our day in Palm Beach, which is the water park at MG.

This picture was on the upper deck of the ferry back across the bay. It was dark, and the only light around us was coming from the ferry lights. It was pretty creepy, so PeaGreen and I were telling scary/creepy stories to each other on the way back. There was a clown in costume on the ferry with us (which was really not funny), so that featured into

My favorite was about a group of people who boarded the ferry and got underway, but the trip just kept going and going, never getting any closer to land. It was pretty spooky; I was really glad when we got into position to drive off!

It was fun listening to the things my kiddo came up with.

 

Our community service partner this year is The Giving Field, which is a charity garden in our community. It is all organic, and sends all its produce to 2 soup kitchens in our area. So far this year, they’ve sent over 9,000lbs of produce to feed the hungry. It has been a lot of fun working with them. The kids are learning a lot about how to garden, and harvest. It’s been really nice seeing the beds that we’ve worked in flourish. We go every month, and it’s been a good thing.

Last month, our city held it’s first ever PRIDE event, and it was amazing! Beaumont PRIDE was such a great coming together of our community – we were there to support our friends and fellow homeschooling families! In addition to the festivities,  $1,650.00 was raised and donated to the Southeast Texas Food Bank. After spending the morning at Pride, we went back to our friend’s house for grilled outdoor goodness and a surprise engagement. It was a lovely and amazing day!
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Last but not least… some crafting has been going on around here – I wanted a TARDIS suitcase, and since I couldn’t find one I liked anywhere, I made one. It’s painted on all four sides, and the front is topped with blue glitter paint (to give it some sparkle). I’m quite happy with it:

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I also got to attend a WFTDA Officiating Clinic with a couple of my fellow officials from SRG. We learned a lot, and got to make some great connections in the derby world.

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I also had the privilege of speaking at a local homeschool conference put on by HomeBased Learning. I talked about the ‘typical’ homeschooling day, and about socialization. I will probably make another post with more on that; there were some awesome things that some of the other speakers presented that I want to explore. It was a fun experience, and I look forward to doing something similar in the future.

Hope your summer is going well!

Warmly,
~h

When Life Gets in the Way

It must be a rule that homeschooling bloggers do fine for a while, but inevitably, they seem to get wrapped up in living life and blogging falls to the wayside. That’s certainly true in my case; whereas I used to update regularly, over the last year or so, updates have become sporadic. I’ve made numerous resolutions to myself to get back into the habit of blogging regularly – even have a reminder on my calendar on my phone – and still, somehow time slips past and another day, week, month has gone by without me updating.

But, rather than spend a lot of time making excuses, I’d rather tell you about what we’ve been up to! I last updated in January, and since then, things have really exploded around here! Not literally, thank goodness – actual explosions would be a little bit hard to handle. But schedule-wise, we’ve never been more busy than we have been over the last few months.

One of the biggest changes to our homeschooling life has been the addition of a co-op class to our homeschool group. Some of the group members and I have been talking about it for a year or so; the idea of a co-op has always appealed to me, but we just never had the right dynamic. But about a month ago, we finally got it started! Our co-op meets weekly, and has 3 groups of students: A group (ages 10-13); B group (ages 7-9) and C group (ages 4-6). We also have a nursery group. We have 16 students and 2 babes-in-arms, with 7 families participating.

We’re just wrapping up our first round of classes – Science Lab (in prep for our group Science Fair), French, Art, PE, and ‘Life School’ which is a practical math class. Our second round of classes will include Geography (landforms & maps), Science Lab (experiments) and continue with French, Art and PE.

Here are a couple of pics form our art class:

 

 

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We’ve been hiking in the Big Thicket – we went on a post-burn hike to check out the forest after a prescribed burn. The burn was only in certain sections of the trail so it was really cool to see the difference between the burned sections and the non-nursed sections. There were scorches on the trees higher than we were tall, which was both interesting and kinda scary – I can’t imagine being in the woods during a fire!
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And started a new community service project this year, with a local charity garden, The Giving Field. On our first trip out, we helped harvest a total of 17.5 lbs of various salad greens – kale, lettuce, and spinach. We’ll be working with them throughout this year, which will give the kids a chance to see the garden through the entire year, from preparation, to planting, to growth and harvest, to nurturing the soil and planning for next year’s planting.DSCF0138

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We also visited the San Jacinto Monument and Battleship TEXAS with our homeschool group recently:

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participated in our first college tour:
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PeaGreen is yet to be convinced, but I think LBB would go tomorrow if I let him. He seemed quite take with the idea of dorm living.
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as well as a host of other field trips that I haven’t been diligent in photographing. Thankfully, a new camera has recently found its way into my possession (after the sad demise of my last camera – fully loaded with pictures, mind you – in the watery grave of Village Creek last year), so perhaps I’ll be more motivated to update. No promises though ;)

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Rest assured that we’re still around – LBB is wrapping up his first year of middle school (MIDDLE SCHOOL!!!!) and PeaGreen will start in the fall. It’s so odd how much more self-directed they are becoming as they get older. We do still harp on the basics, but they’re actually interested in pursuing their own studies as well. I’m continually amazed!

It’s spring time, which means that we’ll be getting our garden started soon. Then, summertime is right around the corner. Time flies…

Keep in touch!

Warmly,
~h

Teach Them to do for Themselves

I’ve been seeing a lot of posts in the homeschool community about not measuring up. There was a time when homeschooling was fairly synonymous with genius-level intelligence. Even though that stereotype still gets lip-service, as homeschooling becomes more and more popular, it’s just us normal folks, with normal kids schooling in the kitchen these days (or maybe that shows my own perceptions…).

Not only that, but as my kids get older, we’re coming up on the point in time where we’re moving past the basics and into more future career and interest driven learning – meaning that the boys will have more say in what they learn about.*

One of the mantras that I use is ‘Education isn’t about teaching them everything. It’s about exposing them to as much as possible, and teaching them HOW to find the things they need to know, when they need to know it’.

It’s about teaching them to read directions. I didn’t teach my kids how to cook; I taught them how to read, what measurements are and how to properly read/decipher fractions, fire/heat safety and where the dishes go. Nowadays, they can cook anything they have a recipe for (and clean up the kitchen afterwards, too).

That’s kind of how I approach their education. My main goal is to expose them to as much as possible. We do all of the regular subjects – reading, writing, math, science, history, etc.; and I also cover the arts, health, physical education, and other ‘normal’ things that you’d find in any school. But I also glaze over things that may not hold their attention as well as other things. For example: when we covered Vikings, the kids were crazy into it, so we lingered there. Did a lapbook, build a forge in the backyard so the kids could play at being blacksmiths, read a couple of Viking-centered stories, watched How to Train Your Dragon 3 times, and other fun Viking-related stuff. But now, we’re in 1600′s England, with Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots and King James and the kids are all ‘ Ho-hum… can get skip this and get to the Black Death already??’ In a word, yes. Glazing… it can be a wonderful thing!

Even though this is one of my personal favorite times in history (reformation of the church, splitting off of the Puritans, the reign of Elizabeth I and the powerhouse that was England… so exciting!), the kids aren’t feeling it right now. But, the beauty of history is that it repeats, so in a few years, we can cover this again, and maybe they’ll be more interested in the same parts I am. And, their lack of interest doesn’t keep me from re-reading the things that I enjoy.

Back to how this applies to homeschooling, though… education is meant to be the foundation upon which your life is built. Helping ensure that my kids have a solid knowledge of the basics means that from there, they have the keys to unlock everything set before them. They can then learn about any subject or field that they choose to; their options are limited only by what they believe they can do.

To sum up, I don’t have to be a perfect, rigorous, every-day-8a-3p, scheduled homeschooling mom in order to be successful, and have successful kids, and neither do you. We just have to teach them the basics, and empower them to do for themselves. Because they can. And they will.

Warmly,
~h

*We are eclectic homeschoolers. I like traditional/classical education for the younger years, moving more towards interest/career path learning as they get older.

 

Fight for Kids, Not Against Them

I came across this article the other day that was about fighting for your boys instead of against them. The post was Christian-based, but made some really valid ideas… up to a certain point.

Some of the first things on the page were amazing observations; that as our sons grow, feeling that we (parents and children) weren’t on the same team anymore; that it’s normal for our children to challenge parental authority as a natural part of breaking from the family unit to seek/establish their own identity; and that emotions can creep in and do their best to persuade Mom that the child is the problem, rather than the situation/behaviour.

I’m totally with her up to that point. I was expecting similarly ‘aware’ progression and advice/solutions to help a parent and a child work through this stage in a positive and productive manner, but what I got was an utter break in rational thought. To be fair, I didn’t realize that this was a Christian-based article; had I known that, I would have been prepared for the abrupt shift from ‘awareness and reason’ to the ‘slam-the-shutters-down’ glaze of reason in favor of the party-line of Christian-based ignorance.

Rather than offer practical solutions, the author completely ignores the *actual* issues like communication, understanding and the like, she introduces unnecessary confusion into the equation by excusing the child’s behaviour completely by blaming ‘Satan’ as the one who’s destroying your relationship with your child and “Jesus/God” and prayer being the solution. Rather than actually DOING anything, she advocates what boils down to making a series of wishes, crossing your fingers and hoping that things will get better while absolving yourself of any further responsibility. After all, it’s not our fault that these issues escalate; it’s ‘Satan’.

I’ve never understood this  mindset – that parents bear no responsibility. Putting the onus on parents to ‘pray harder’ or ‘do more’ (which usually means getting more involved at church, which ends up taking the parents even further away from their kids) makes parents feel even more helpless, and that things are even further removed from their hands to ‘fix’ things. Perpetuating the idea that parents can’t be wrong under the guise of being ‘godly’ only further alienates children from their parents, because the solutions aren’t family-based. All the kids end up seeing is a parent traveling a road that the child isn’t on, doesn’t understand, or isn’t interested in. More effective, I believe, if for parents to be open to the idea that they may have things ALL WRONG. Examine their methods and look for flaws. Admitting to their mistakes, acknowledging their humanity and propensity to make mistakes levels the playing field and puts you all firmly on the same side. How much easier is it for a child to admit to his mistakes when a parent first admits their own?

I believe in helping my children understand that they control their own actions, just as I do. We all make decisions each and every step of our lives, and they aren’t always the right ones. But even a misstep can be re-directed. It’s not some invisible evil that tempts and lures us; it’s decision-making on our part. Sure, we can be led astray, or get lost for a time, but having a family structure that allows for mistakes and is supportive about correcting them can help set things right again. Cultivating an environment within the family of being honest with ourselves about how we feel, what we need, asking for help when we need it, and a host of other issues that both begin and end with the parents. I don’t believe that there is an invisible force that will magically fix things, or in excusing my children’s undesirable behaviours (due to immaturity, lack of experience or hormonally-driven out of control emotions) because of ‘Satan’. Poking your head in the sand never solved anything. Perpetuating a culture of helplessness by shirking the monumental task of raising children to be responsible, self-aware adults who contribute positively to society is detrimental to our future on this planet. It’s even more difficult when the parents are re-working their own childhood trauma to make better decisions for their own families.

The practical solution to this issue begins when they are small. Children understand language long before they have the ability to speak. If even a 6 month old dog can understand basic commands, think how much more intelligent our children are. If we give our children the vocabulary to describe their feelings, help them focus on how they feel as a basis for asking for what they need, imagine how much more concise their communication will be when they’re older. Sometimes, for myself especially, this means learning to do that for yourself is the first step – and it’s a hard one. While this is my ideal, it’s certainly not always attainable; I’m human and fallible, not a robot that can be programmed without deviation to a previous operating system. I’ve also failed in numerous ways to override my first impulse and implement the new ways of communication that I’ve striven to learn. Thankfully, my kids are both understanding and forgiving, and we continue to learn together.

I’m not an expert of child-rearing, but I do know that ‘prayer’, at least when applied to this type of situation, isn’t a solution. It may be part of a solution, but it’s not going to work without the active involvement of the parents and cooperative action from the children. Kids need active parenting – proActive parenting, even. Especially as pre-teens and teens, when they’re going through the agonizing process of separating themselves from their identity as an almost-adult instead of ‘X’s child’. I would so much rather have my children know that they can come to me with mist-steps along the way and know that they will find a hearing (and understanding) ear rather than a disappointed tut-tut and reference to the Nation of Israel, or some other biblical anecdote that vaguely mirrors the situation they’ve come to me with (I always HATED that as a kid).

I don’t ‘like’ organized religion as a whole; that’s no secret. But if you’re religious, that’s fine – pray, pray for your kids, pray with them. But please don’t make the mistake of praying and thinking that you’re done. Offspring are long-term projects; ones that take YEARS to fully develop, and they need you every step of the way.

Warmly,
~h

NYR’s 2014 – Better Late than Never!

New Year’s resolutions tend to be a joke among the general population. Not that I don’t get a good laugh at all the unrealistic, radical lifestyle changes that people plan to put into action like flipping a switch, but I find it somewhat insulting that the plan to make changes has become so cliche’. Most of my friends make resolutions, and actually do work towards them. Either their resolutions are more realistic, or they’re more motivated than the average Joe; but I’m lucky to be around people who are inspiring me to continue working towards my goals well into the month.
I’ve flip-flopped back and forth about whether to do resolutions this year, and about how to do them. There’s a trend right now about choosing a single word or phrase that sums up your goals and making that your theme for the year. I like that idea, but don’t know exactly if it will work for me… but who knows. Once I getall of this out of my head and onto the screen, I may find a theme when proofreading!

So, I am going to do my traditional 9, and update my last year’s resoloutions as well (as usual). Here’s last year’s post; I’m late this year – it’s Jan. 14th already.

2014 NYRs:

1.) Food – Join the local produce co-op; cook with more fresh (and unusual) foods. Be more open to trying new recipes, including gluten free, vegan, vegetarian and other diverse styles. We’ve been in a rut food-wise and I am ready to get out of it! Also – freezer meals. I’m feeling freezer meals in 2014.

2.) Home Improvement – this is an on-going thing. We’re planning for a new roof in the spring, and hopefully the kids’ rooms will be finished this year (again).

3.) Health & Fitness – Rather than put pressure on myself again for a specific belt goal, I am going to plan on karate 2x per week, and biking or walking/running 2 miles per week. I also want to do two 5k’s this year. More would be great, but at least those two. I said one last year, and didn’t do it, so TWO this year! (Maybe even 3!)

4.) Kids – They’re really growing up now! I’d love for a family vacation to be on the menu this year (even if it’s a camping trip or weekend in Houston, Galveston or San Antonio). I really want to start bigger art projects with them. They’re always interested in my art, so I want to get them set up in collaborative projects with me, and with others.

5.) Husband – Date Nights are always in the plan! I’d like to put into use some of the things I’ve Pinned on my board for dates or sweet things to do for him. Mini-break would be just heavenly!!

6.) Myself – Art Classes; Journalistas, Mom’s Night Outs… all of this and more on a regular basis! Writing workshop – if I can find one, go to it! Write, write, WRITE. Also, wanting to get back into painting this year. Even if it’s Painting with a Twist ;)

7.) Extended Family – Visit my parents more, continue working on family history/genealogy research. Maybe plan a big family reunion.

8.) Community – We’re Spiral Scouting this year, in addition to our regular community service work that we do thought school. That will lend the kids even more opportunities to help out on a larger basis. We’re already signed up for a river clean-up and plan to pitch in on a creek clean up as well.

9.) Work – Finish my BFUSA cert., start looking into pre-req.s for school (for me!).

So there…. those are my plans for this year. Maybe my theme could be ‘Onward and Upward’…

2013 recap:

  1. Complete ‘Wreck this Journal’, and keep up with the Art Journalistas group on Facebook. (It’s a secret group; one for my IRL friends and I to post pictures and progress and meet up to browse each others’ books. We’re starting in January.) 2014: DONE!! I’m working on my second journal in this series as we speak (or as I type). 
  2. repaint living room & kids’ rooms (also includes new beds in their rooms, decor and the like) 2014: FAIL (klaxon) I painted about 2/5 of the living room and hate the color. Haven’t even started on the kids rooms. Why is this is HARD to accomplish??
  3. spend more time with Grandmama & Mom & Dad (My mom had a stroke this past year, and it really pointed out how little time we spend together. Plus, my grandmother’s sister died a few weeks ago – her younger sister – which really brought home how much time she may have left. Making more time to visit with my family needs to be a priority this year.) 2014: DONE (and continue to do. I could spend MORE time with them, but who can’t say that? Keeping them in my plans for this year as well.
  4. Harry Potter Marathon. I’ve talked about it many times… now is the time. ALL of the movies – one weekend. 2014: Meh… The kids and I have started working through the HP series as part of their literature and reading assignments. They’re enjoying the book, so when we finish a book, the plan is to watch the movie, then do a comparison diagram.
  5. Karate: keep on keepin’ on. I’d like to be a green belt (or maybe even blue!) by the end of the year… though I am  not the one who has the final say in whether or not I get to test; still, I plan on working hard, and I think that green is doable over the next 12 months. I also want to learn the Dojo Kun in Japanese. Also included in this res is going to be general health/fitness goals. More HAES, less sighing over a flat stomach. 2014: I took a break form karate from July-December. 3x a week was stressing me out with all the other stuff that’s always on my plate. I just burnt out of it. So I’ve started again this year, and am only committing myself to 2x per week (Tues & Thurs) so my weekend is free. Other health/fitness goals have suffered for the last 5 months or so, but I am back on track.
  6. Submit at least one writing project for publication (AnnA – gonna need your help on this). I also want to work on establishing and maintaining a regular writing schedule this year, and collaborate more with AnnA (my amazing writing partner – click her name above and read her blog!). Also, check out the local writer’s guild group again. I tried it a while back and it wasn’t my cuppa; it’s been a while though, so maybe fresh meat? 2014: FAIL  on everything but collab. with AnnA. She’s back in town though, so I foresee more collabs in the future.
  7. Date Night with Loverly Husband at least 1x each month. we did really well on this a while back, but have gotten away from it and it shows, so back onto the list it goes. Up this week: Django Unchained. At some point this coming year, I also want to take a mini-break, just the two of us. San Antonio or Dallas, maybe. 2014: Once a month was maybe pushing it – we resolve, but we have a life. The good thing about it is that even if we don’t get to go out alone together, we still enjoy one another’s company when hanging out at home, or with the kids. But a mini-break does sound heavenly.
  8. Family Vacation – we so very much need to do this. We’re in better financial shape that ever before, so maybe this is doable this year. 2014: Back on the list for this year!
  9. Run a 5K… or walk a 5K. I really want to do a Color Run and/or a Tough Mudder…. or aZombie Walk… or a Flash Mob. Something along those lines. We have friends who are into 5Ks as a family and it looks like fun. I’d love to get the kids involved in something like that. 2014: FAIL – but I’m not giving up! The color run is coming up, and we have a Zombie Response Team in the area now, so maybe a Zombie Walk is forthcoming ;)

So… that’s that. I’m not updating the past years’ goals like I have in the past. Some of that is irrelevant; much of it is still on the list.

I thought that while I was on the subject of goals, I’d make a few homeschool goals for this year as well:

1.) Stick to our schedule a bit better. We did well through October, but November and December were difficult to keep on-track. January has been barely holding on; we need to do better.

2.) Math manipulatives – get better use out of them! We have a ton, and they just sit in the cabinet for the most part.

3.) Make use of Pinterest in a more productive manner. There are so many cool things there – that’s why I pinned them!! Now, the trick is to use them!

 

In any case, I think I will stick with Upward and Onward as my theme for this year. How about you – themes for the year, or traditional resolutions? Share yours!

Warmly,
~h

Embarking on Year 5 of Homeschooling

Wow – I can’t believe that we’re about to start our 5th year of homeschooling. It’s mind-blowing! It definitely doesn’t seem like that long, but neither I, nor the kids are planning to stop or go back to more traditional school anytime soon. Homeschooling has really become more than ‘something we do’; more than ever, it’s how we live.

I was looking back over some of the first blog posts I made, and it surprises me how much we’ve changed over the years – and what remains the same. Some of the traditions we started observing way back then are still part of our routine today. Tea time stands out as a big one (though admittedly, tea happens more than once during the day now, but we still gather in the kitchen for a cuppa). Field trips are still on Tuesdays, and we still mostly have school in our jammies.

Other things have changed. We have dramatically increased the amount of work assigned over the years. Back when we first started, I only focused on math, reading, handwriting and grammar. We did a bit of history (mostly pre-history – dinos and hunter-gatherer societies) and some literature (which Mommy read). But as we finished our first year, I added more – spelling, history (formally; Story of the World I) and science, along with lapbooking and notebooking, to what was already on our plate. By the next year (year 3), I added even more – research projects, science fair, public speaking, community service,  individualized science, and geography. This past year (year 4) brought journaling (notebooking’s larger, more intimidating cousin), pre-algebra and even more critical thinking work into the mix. I bring this up because I see some of my friends and other newbies playing the comparison game. I get called ‘rigorous’ all the time, but I’m not, really – just really focused with the kids on college. They’re comparing where they are (just beginning to homeschool – some not even a full 6 months in) to where we are, four years past that. It’s not a fair comparison! If you’re one of those people, I say to you, “Don’t be so hard on yourselves, newbies!! Chillax for a minute. There’s plenty of time yet.”

LBB is in middle school now. In the fall, both of my boys will be in jr. high. I’m shocked at how very grown up my babies are now. They’re coming out with full-on developed concepts now; theories about *things* that they’ve learned about independently. It’s lovely to see, and to hear that their thinking process is balanced with a healthy dose of freethinking and skepticism, along with wise-eyed wonder, creativity and pure child-like fantasy. 

We have big plans for this year, including LBB’s introduction to the Civil Air Patrol. We looked into it a few years ago, bt you have to be 12 to participate, and with LBB’s recent birthday, he’s finally old enough. Loverly Husband expressed interest in joining their adult program, so maybe this will be something they can do together. We’ve kinda slacked off on karate. I keep dabbling with the thought of getting back into it, but the motivation remains to be seen. LBB expressed interest in taking tennis lessons (continued interest from this past summer), so we may be looking into that instead. PeaGreen is still taking karate lessons, but only occasionally.

Curric-wise, much of what we’re using will remain the same as when we started ‘seat work’ back in August.

  • Math – Everyday Math 5 & 6 plus workbooks & journaling
  • Spelling – Dr. Spello, word bank, workbook lessons
  • Grammar – DOL/ HM English & Thoughtful Journals
  • History – Story of the World III & Activity Guide & Lapbook; composer/artist study
  • Science – Journaling/Nature Study/ text for 5th & 6th grade / gardening
  • Current Events – Morning Board/ CNN student news / community service
  • Weekly research project
  • Writing – creative writing/narrative/non-fiction/ picture-prompts
  • handwriting practice
  • reading/literature
  • PE/Health – FLASH
  • Spiral Scouts

Our homeschool group is planning to begin a co-op in mid-January that will offer classes in art, science labs and some electives. If not, then we’ll have to add all that stuff in as well.

On the homefront, we got a puppy a few months ago. He’s a chi-weenie (half chihuahua, half dachshund) and he’s adorable!

That’s about it for now. I plan to update more regularly this year – it’s one of my NYR’s, which will be posted in the next week or so. Until then, enjoy the rest of your holiday time!

Warmly,
~h

 

 

We Must Speak Out.

InstinctiveMom:

The Pearls and their ‘ministry’ are under fire again. Another dead child ‘in the name of god’. HOW are these people still publishing? Their most recent victim is Hana Williams. This beautiful girl  ‘was found face down, naked and emaciated in the backyard; her death was caused by hypothermia and malnutrition‘. I am re-blogging this from 2010 to raise awareness for the appalling things that are being done to these children – the dangerous, horrendous, sickening things. 

I am also calling out to Christian parents to speak out as well. This is being done in the name of YOUR god. This is your Heavenly Father’s name that is being dragged through the mud. I was raised Christian, and there’s no way that the god I was raised to know would approve of the methods advocated in To Train Up A Child.

If you haven’t read it, check here for the full text. If you want just the highlights, check Patheos, here.

To add your name/blog to the public boycott, and get your own banner/sticker for your website or blog, check MuseMama here.

Seriously. SPEAK OUT.
~h

Originally posted on This Adventure Life:

I’ve been aware of and vocal in other internet arenas about the horror of the writings, teaching and actions by followers of Michael and Debi Pearl for years. Between them and Gary Ezzo’s Babywise series, I’ve had many conversations about these books and philosophy, both with moms online and in real life, and once even with Anne Marie Ezzo herself, and I have yet to find any value in what reads like a ‘how to’ manual for child abuse. In fact, many of the methods purported to help you raise perfect children are so completely contrary to the notion of biblical ‘grace’ that it makes me wonder how people who profess to imitate Jesus could be so blind.  It literally makes me ill to hear people defend these books and even more so the people who wrote them.

I will say that I don’t think that parents intentionally pick…

View original 564 more words

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