Homeschooling: It's not what we do, it's how we live.

Kid Craft

Happy New Year 2017

happy-2017

So it’s that time of year again; when everyone posts their resolutions and goals for the new year. I’m not immune to the appeal of ‘starting fresh’ and making a grand effort to improve myself and my life – the changing of the calendar from one year to the next is a natural transition, and it feels good and productive to have goals. Last year, rather than making ‘resolutions’ for 2016, I went with an overall theme for the year. It was trendy a few years back, but I really liked that idea, and it worked better for me than having ultra-specific resolutions.

My theme for 2016, so you don’t have to go back and find that post, was ‘mindfulness’, which is basically the practice of living in the present moment (hard to do when anxiety disorder is part of your life, which is why it felt like something I needed to work on). That’s still one of my favorite words, and I find that it will continually be on my list of ‘things to work on’. It wasn’t a total success, but, as my music teacher is often saying, ‘progress, not perfection!”. In that light, I do think that having an overall theme was easier to maintain than a list of ‘rules’ to have to follow.

Here’s a re-cap of my goals in that theme from last year:

meditation – I practice on my own, but I really would like to make it part of my week to go to the group sit at St. Mark’s. They meet twice a week; I want to make at least one of them.

simplify – KonMari! I want to clear out things that don’t make me happy, from possessions to wardrobe to household goods

health – movement and community – walking with playgroup; with the kids; family health; focus on cleaner eating

relationships – tend those I care about and cut loose those I don’t

I didn’t actually make it to St. Marks for meditation with the group, well … ever. The timing wasn’t something I could ever work into my schedule. After giving it some thought, and making my personal meditation practice a priority, I didn’t feel the need to practice with a group as much. Now, I’m content to continue my personal practice in private. As for simplifying… well, that didn’t work out either; at least not in the KonMari way. I did do some downsizing and re-organizing, but nothing that could be categorized as a clean sweep in the KonMari way. We finally got our storage building moved into our backyard, so that alleviated a lot of the clutter inside the house, but there’s more (always) to be done. It’s a process, so while I didn’t exactly meet my original goal, I don’t feel like that was a total failure, either. Health/Nutrition/Fitness are always going to be a focus – more so in the coming year with the decline in my parents’ health, but that’s a long story best told over coffee. I went walking with the group once, and tried to go with another group, but that didn’t work out according to the original plan, either. I did purchase a new bicycle a few months ago, so that’s what I’ve been doing, because I enjoy biking more than walking. The kids have their bikes, too and we ride together – another bonus. This year, I want to get a bike rack so we can take our bikes to local biking trails and ride (or maybe we can just work on increasing our distance and ride to a park that’s not too awful far away). As for relationships, I feel like I’ve been stretched too thin to effectively be a friend to some of the people I actually do care about. There are definitely a few friends who have become long-distance friends that I need to make more of an effort to connect with.

This year, I am going to go with the same one-word theme, but more action-oriented. Mindfulness can be an action word, but it feels more passive to me. Now, at the end of the year, I’m feeling antsy – like I need to move and ‘do’. To satisfy that need, I’ve chosen ‘create’ as my theme. Here are some things I want to create this year:

  • space – both in a physical and metaphysical sense. In the real world, I want to create peaceful, relaxing spaces in my home. This means taking charge of clutter and possessions that no longer serve me or my family, or our purpose. I have really been drawn to the idea of minimalism over the past couple of years, and while I won’t say I am ready to go all in just yet, I feel the need to free up space in my home and my head, and I feel like downsizing all the things might be a step in the right direction. This aspect also includes clearing away obligations and activities that no longer fit my needs or bring me joy or relaxation, or free up time so that I can spend more of it with my kids and Loverly Husband. A relatively inflexible rule I’ve established over the last couple of months has been to say no to things I don’t truly, deeply enjoy or that put money in my family’s budget. I’m spread very thin, and I need to take back some of that time.
  • memories – this is something that is so very important to me; that my children have a rich childhood filled with memorable experiences and traditions to carry with them throughout their lives and one day pass on to their own kids. We’ve made an effort to have game nights and do things as a family that do just that: create a memory. We only have a few years of ‘childhood’ left; I want to make the most of them. I’d like 2017 to have an emphasis on ‘creating memories’  – simple things like rock painting, cooking together, game nights, traveling and other fun (inexpensive, low-key) stuff.
  • art – creating art is something I always come back to. This takes many forms: art journaling, writing, painting, crafting… I like them all. Some of the time I take from other things needs to be focused on creating more of the thing my soul craves.
  • music – I started playing cello this past year, and began piano lessons earlier in December. I used to play flute and clarinet in school, but dropped it after I graduated. I’d forgotten how much I loved it; playing music occupies my entire body – mind, hands, attention, eyes – it’s a full-body experience. For someone who struggles with depression and anxiety, having something that’s so all-consuming to drown in has been an amazing relief. Since my kids are also taking music lessons (both on violin), it’s also something we can do together, which I love.
  • change – activism has been a part of my life for years now, in small ways. As my kids get older and demand less of my time, I feel the need to get involved with larger efforts to affect positive change. I’m not sure exactly what route this path will lead me on just yet, but it’s something I am motivated to accomplish.

 

create

So… that’s my word for this year. What’s yours?
Happy New Year!
Warmly,
~h

Advertisements

Lapbooking in High School

lapbooking in highschoolWe love lapbooking. It’s one of those cool things that I had seen around the internet on homeschooling sites when I was new to the game that I thought was cool, but had no idea what it was or how to do it. Once I finally got my hands on a few, I fell in love and started helping the kids make them for pretty much everything.

First off, if you’ve never heard of lapbooking, it’s basically a way to organize all the information your students learn about something. They can span a single topic or person, like ‘alligators’ or ‘Queen Elizabeth I’, or cover a resource, like a novel or other book, like ‘Little House in the Big Woods‘, or they can span the length of a subject, like the lapbooks that correspond with Story of the World that were created by a couple of amazing mama-bloggers. Most lapbooks use what’s called a ‘mini book’ to house a piece of information. It may be a flap with a question on it, or a chart with diagrams, or a pocket with vocabulary cards and definitions on them. They’re part ‘open the flap’ book, part book report, part essay-question, part arts-and-crafts… they’re extremely versatile and you end up with a pretty cool way to display what your child has learned or material you’ve covered. As the kids get older, they can play a role in creating and decorating the lapbook as well, which really makes it their own.

If you have kids with sensory issues, or ADHD, lapbooks can also help in a couple of ways. First, for attention issues, lapbooks tend to break a subject or source into small, bite-sized pieces that make it easy to focus on one thing, complete it and move on. without getting overwhelmed with the bulk of material to cover. Additionally, the process of cutting and creating the book gives your child a hands-on way to process the information. If you have a child with sensory issues, then again, the hands-on aspect helps, because each bit of information is contained within a ‘mini book’ or insert that must be unfolded, twisted, opened, turned or otherwise manipulated to get to the information.

We started off with lapbooking and moved more into notebooking, which is similar, but more the ‘grown up’ sibling of lapbooking. Less ‘arts-and-crafts’ and more ‘deeper content’, which is good. But of course, you can make lapbooks more in-depth or focus more closely on a single topic or aspect of your subject matter. We use cheap composition notebooks (which are thankfully on sale right now!) for basically everything. Some, the kids just write their own content in and others, I print a page or template out and they paste it into their book after the work is done. That also creates a really cool product when you come to the end of the project/subject/topic.

If you’re into unit studies, then lapbooking is an excellent tool for that. There are hundreds available online to download for free, including ones I’ve created or found online and shared here, and many more that are more comprehensive from sites like HomeschoolShareTeachersPayTeachers and CurrClick.com. Homeschooling blogs are another great source of finding lapbooks on specific topics or using specific resources. But something I have noticed is that most lapbooks tend to cater to the elementary school crowd. What do you do when your kids ‘age out’ of what’s available online, and how do you incorporate lapbooking into curriculum for an older student?

That’s where I am at right now, and I would love to see what you’ve done with your kids if you kept lapbooking as part their studies. Our homeschool group is studying Russia for our next Social Studies Club meeting, so I am going to be working on helping the kids create something high-school-appropriate for that presentation. I’ll let you know how that turns out!

Warmly,
~h

 

 

 

 


Summery Time Fun

 

blue_watercolor_chevron_1_1024x1024This month has been a little slower than usual. We’ve been taking it kinda easy, and letting the kids adjust to the new norm after the loss of Loverly Husband’s grandmother at the end of May. Academically, we spent the beginning of the month on our ‘summertime’ schedule, which is overall a little bit lighter than what they’re assigned during the fall and spring. Towards the end of the month, to present, we’ve been on vacation – our 3-week break before starting our new school year. It’s been nice! Normally, we have a ton of stuff going on during the summer, but the last few weeks have been pretty low-key and I have been enjoying the break immensely.

Our first official summer-time thing was the Teen Social for June. We met at the movie theater and dropped the kids off to see Alice: Through the Looking Glass while the moms had lunch and a chat in peace. It was fun for us – not so much for the kids (though I suspect the enjoyed it more than they let on). In any case, this new ‘spending time with teens’ thing has been really great. We went for a long time without older kids in our homeschool group, and I am so glad we have that social time now! Self-care has been a big part of my routines lately, so I treated myself to the new Through the Looking Glass makeup palette from Urban Decay, and playing around with makeup looks from YouTube.

2016-07-01_20.47.02

We had a yearbook club meeting somewhere in there… I didn’t get pictures, but I do have a couple of screenshots from our soon-to-be-finished yearbook! I’m so excited about having these this year. We’ve looked at it before, but the idea never materialized. There are so many great moms in our group who are motivated to make things happen right now and I am loving it. Without their vision and take charge attitude, a lot of the ideas we’ve had as a  group would still be just ‘plans’. Here’s a screenshot of the students’ page. We also have a family page for each family, and individual pages planned for our two seniors this year.

stubodsample3

Earlier in the month was Beaumont’s PRIDEFestival, and this was our third year to support the LGBTQ community locally. My organization, Whole Mothering Center, sponsored a kids’ area with a big bounce house (in princess pink), and we brought the kids out to help. Unfortunately, the weather was being typically Texas with sunshine for 20 minutes, followed by a half hour of torrential downpour, followed by sun, then rain, then sun… basically all morning long. The kids were *soaked* through and miserable for a little while there. The boys had plans with some friends around noon, but we ended up having to go all the way back home so they could shower and change before I took them to meet their friends. It wasn’t the best time, but it was definitely an experience to remember!

 

CAM04124_Doug_Decebal_Coloreith

 

IMG_20160611_112933

 

Most of the next week was rained out – we had grand plans for a canoe trip, but with all the rain,the water was too high to be safe, so we ended up spending most of the week at home, trying to stay out of the rain.

Our Father’s Day was a lazy one. The kids and I bought all of Loverly Husband’s favorite snacks, and cards from each of us to show him how much we appreciate him. Our homeschool group is planning to host a co-op in the fall; one for high schoolers, and one for elementary aged kids, and the elementary co-op planning committee met earlier in the week. They had a Father’s Day craft for the little kids that was so cute – a tree with hand prints for the leaves. I brought it home for the boys – we missed out on a lot of those types of crafts, so I thought it would be funny to do and give to their dad… and it was! The boys’ hand prints are bigger than mine – they had trouble staying on the page!

CAM04163 (1)

Our homeschool group has a park day planned for June 20th, but we moved it indoors since the weather is so awful – srsly, if you’ve never been to Texas, summertime is like trying to drink the air; it’s THAT humid. That’s why our school motto is ‘It’s not the heat; it’s the humidity’. Never has a phrase been uttered more often than when making and subsequently cancelling plans that involve any length of time spent outdoors.

We had a new opportunity come up this month for a few of the moms in our homeschool group. Our local Regional Educational Service Center offered a ‘Youth Mental Health First Aid’ course on the 21st. Their goal is to help parents and teachers and others who work with teens recognize some of the warning signs of teens in mental health crisis and train you to offer support until professionals can be contacted. It was an interesting course, and I am so glad we went. We each were given a certification and a book with more information on specific mental health issues. If you have the chance, look for a class near you through your local REC. Here’s a map if you’re in Texas. If you’re not in TX, the Great and powerful Google can probably help.

YMHFA course - june21,2016
On the 23rd was our annual trip to Moody Gardens. I didn’t get any pictures because I was very busy chillaxin’ in the sand while the kids were off doing whatever kids do. It was fantastic and relaxing, and I LOVE having older kids for stuff like this.CAM04186

CAM04188

Though PeaGreen’s actual birthday wasn’t until the beginning of July, we celebrated a bit early with fried and a movie and sleepover. He’s 13 now – no more babies *at all* around here! I have mixed feelings about it. On the one hand, Loverly Husband and I make pretty cute kids, and I’d love to see what more of them would look like. But on the other hand, they’re turning into such amazing young men, and I can’t imagine starting over at this point.

Aidan 13

CAM04209

The end of June saw us doing a ‘career path’ field trip with the SETX Regional Planning Commission. The SETXRPC is a collection of agencies that do, literally, all kinds of things for the 3 local counties in this area, from social work to transportation to emergency services and more. It was really cool to hear the 3 presenters they chose talk about their jobs and how they got there; they all emphasized the importance of building your reputation as a young person, and networking through various educational and employment opportunities, which is something I am sure all of our parents do, but somehow that kind of advice carries more weight when it comes from strangers.
CAM04211

CAM04212

We kicked off July with a full-family ‘stay-cation’, and our annual Independence Day Bash. Though Loverly Husband is back at work,  the boys and I still have another week of vacation left and I mean to make the most of it. I’ve been crafting; making DIY refillable makeup palettes (because spending $20 a pop on a z-palette is insanity) and being lured by the de-potting movement in the makeup world.

2016-07-07_23.52.55

I’ll have a high-school-homeschool planning post up soon, so be sure to subscribe and check back!
Hope your summer is rolling peacefully along!

Warmly,
~h


Mid-December Update

december_wallpaper_by_endosage-d5nugix

This week, I am happy to report that the illness has finally left the building. It touched the kids briefly (thank you, 3 years of breastfeeding), so we were able to carry on with what we had planned. That was a huge relief because, in addition to a full week’s calendar, it was LBB’s birthday Thursday, and Loverly Husband’s birthday on Saturday.

Moving on…

Social Studies Club – Each month, our homeschool group hosts a social studies club. We choose a new country/state/territory as the focus for each month. The kids all do a project of their choice. I love this format, because it means that all the kids can participate; it’s not limited to any grade level or ability. They also get to choose whatever area of study they want to work in, so the projects can be whatever strikes their fancy. We opted to do a group project, on Japanese culture; Kabuki theater/performance. We outlined the history of Kabuki, with a timeline for the project; discussed the finer points of a kabuki theater design with visual aids; and discussed elements of style and play structure with models of kabuki masks. The boys and I all worked on each part of the project together, and then presented a different piece of it for the oral presentation. It was a fun project!

Monday was spent putting the finishing touches on our social studies club projects. Lots of painting and crafting, and we got them finished with time to spare. We had originally planned on making a model of a kabuki stage, but that got to be too complex, so we we went with a diagram and an art piece instead. The projects turned out well, and I am really pleased with them. Now that the boys are done with them, I am going to have the masks framed with the timeline in the background for the living room. We don’t have a ton of ‘good’ art, but this is interesting and will make a good conversation piece!

Every year, our homeschool group chooses a charity to work with. Currently, we’re working with Southeast Texas Atheists Helping the Homeless. Every month, they collect items to give out at a local park. We haven’t been able to go yet due to scheduling conflicts, but this month, we got together with our group and made scarves. The process was super easy – we made about 40 scarves in about 2 hours. Even the littlest kids got to help, from cutting fabric to coloring tags – everyone had a job to do, and we had quite the assembly line going!
CAM02806
CAM02811
CAM02836
After scarf-making, we went to the library for the Homeschool Teen Book Club meeting. LBB read Dave Barry’s ‘The Worst Class Trip Ever‘, and PeaGreen read, Corrie Ten Boom’s ‘The Hiding Place’. (The Hiding Place study guide) The other students read a variety of books, including: The House on Mango Street, Huckleberry Finn, and The Prisoner of Cell 23. We played a few rounds of Mad Gab, and then had a great discussion over cheesecake and cookies.
CAM02845

After book club, we went for haircuts (finally)… they were looking like shaggy dogs for a while there!

CAM02850

Thursday was LBB’s 14th birthday. He got Fallout 4, which he’s been wanting since it came out. We’d originally planned on surprising him in the evening, but he chose to wake up super early and caught Loverly Husband on his way to work, so before we left for the day’s activities, he got a pretty good start on his game. I made aphoto collage for another project, but I thought it turned out pretty well, so I thought I’d share it here. These are some of my favorite pictures of this kiddo!

 

Seth 14

Social Studies Club  was also Thursday, and our lovely hostess organized a surprise party for LBB. The boys presented their projects (somewhat less enthusiastically than I’d envisioned) and did a great job. We decided that next month’s country is going to be Australia, so I am excited about getting started on that.
CAM02852
CAM02854
CAM02856
CAM02864
CAM02871

 

When we got home, there was a new treat for Mommy waiting at the mailbox…

CAM02874

I am SUPER EXCITED to dig into this! Participating in NaNoWriMo this year has me all fired up for writing again. I found this set on eBay, which was a pretty good deal – about half of what it cost new. I’ll still need to get the consumable workbook for both boys, but still a very good deal. Our homeschool group is also starting an art group based on Discovering Great Artists. I’m looking forward to that, also.

Home Alone at The Jefferson Theater – I thought I was going to have to work, so we nixed this idea and stayed home instead. We got caught up on Big Bang Theory and watched another episode of Man in the High Castle instead. I’m a big fan of alternate history/reality stories, and I so wanted this to be really good, and it kinda is (if you can overlook multiple glaring idiotic decisions and things that wouldn’t happen in a real-life similar situation). I am enjoying it, with reservations. I haven’t read the book, and am afraid to start it now because of spoilers… once we get through the series, it’ll go on my ‘to-read’ list.

The weekend is filled with birthday shenanigans for Loverly Husband, who turns 39 today, and uncertainty with plans as he and I are both on-call this weekend. Tomorrow’s regularly scheduled events are on hold, too – we would have been handing out our scarves and things with SETXAHH, but it got cancelled due to the weather so we’re planning to go next month.

All in all, a pretty good week!

Warmly,
~h

Filing this under ‘Secular Thursday’ as well. I was going to link it to Smrt Mama’s original post and Secular Thursday community, but her blog appears to have been taken down. It had been inactive for a while, so that’s not entirely surprising, but I am very sad to see it go, especially the list of other secular homeschooling bloggers.
secthurs


Fall 2015 – Book Club, NASA, Shakespeare and more!

152985-autumn-leaves-free-desktop-wallpaper (1)

It seems like I am always playing catch-up, especially when it comes to blogging. I’ve pretty much accepted it, but I always feel guilty when I finally get around to updating. It’s not intentional; I usually start a new post draft for everything I want to write about, only to end up with a bunch of stuff that I decide to condense into one post (like this one) because so much time has passed and making individual posts gets to be a daunting task. One sort-of good thing about the last few months is that I’ve been trying to be more ‘in the moment’ rather than behind the camera, so I don’t have as many pictures of things we’ve been doing as I normally would. As great as I think being part of the moment is, I’ve come to the decision that I regret not having the pictures to preserve the memory, so I’m going back to my normal photo-documenting because that makes me happier. I’d like to say that I ‘learned something’ from this experience, but I don’t think I was ‘addicted to the camera’ in the first place, which is what articles of that kind were targeting. In any case lack of photo evidence does not a clearer schedule make, so let there be words!!

Such is the life of a busy mom, right?
In any case, here’s a snapshot of our life over the last few months:

September
Once again, our local library system is hosting a book club for homeschoolers. And, once again, after a very strong start, our schedules never manage to sync up with the book club schedule. <sigh> I LOVE the book club format, I really do. I love that our library, and especially our fantastic Librarian, make the effort to host the book club each month for our homeschoolers, and it pains me that we’re never quite able to make it work for us. That said, I snagged a group shot from the introductory meeting in September, which of course I am posting in November, because #reasons (#excuses).

CAM02403

There are actually two clubs; one for kids 5-12, and one for 12+, which is awesome since my kids would hardly sit still for another rendition of ‘Goodnight, Moon’. The meeting format for the older kids involves a list of open questions so the kids can share their thoughts and ideas about the books they chose to read. It’s nice to have that variety, rather than limiting the discussion to a single book, but the format took some getting used to, I’ll admit. After the discussion, there’s usually a game and snacks. The first meeting we did an index card ‘getting to know you’ game. Each card held a topic that you were supposed to fill out; things like: top 5 books, 4 musicians, 4 words that describe me, 4 things I like to do… things like that. Then, it 11058577_10153076466066404_3812504784520512969_nwas trivia time with prizes. PeaGreen points out as I am writing this that he won the most M&Ms that day.

We’re doing the ‘choice of books’ format again this year, rather than the standard single book format, and in addition to the books she chooses for the month the kids can choose any book that’s considered ‘classical literature’, or pick a book from the College Board Reading List, which give them plenty of options. For the first month, the kids chose Treasure Island, which we’re currently reading (since we fell behind). November’s option will be 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – we’re working on Literature, too, so this is a great way to cover both. Treasure Island, is, of course, a classic and filled with swashbuckling adventure. One of my favorite adaptations is Disney’s Treasure Planet, but it’s really quite different, so a comparison will be fun. One of the cool things about reading classics is that the book is available online, through Project Gutenberg, and there are options for study guides and teacher’s guides online. Penguin.com has a Teacher’s Guide for Treasure Island, and Tears of Joy Theater offers a guide for 20,000 Leagues.

We also hit our local JumpingWorldUSA, which is a pretty awesome place. I grew up with a big rectangular trampoline, and my kids had a round one when they were little, but nothing compares to a ROOM full of trampolines – floors made of bounce!! Our JW also has a dodge ball court, which is super cool. The kids always end up sweaty and tired when we leave.

October:

Our homeschool group’s teen social for October was at a local comic book shop, the Book Stan. They set up, and brought in some people to teach the kids how to play Magic: the Gathering, which I thought was pretty cool. The kids have collectively taken to calling it ‘nerd cards’, which I find both funny and appropriate. I got to bee the ‘cool mom’ for a half second, because I used to play and still have a collection of cards from way back in the 90’s (that my kids still can’t have). Their collections quickly surpassed mine though and they’re the experts on ‘nerd cards’ now. In addition to playing cards that they’re collecting, the boys both play Hearthstone, which is an online card game similar (in some ways) to M:tG.
CAM02477

Our homeschool group put together a Shakespeare Party in October, too. The kids made paper dolls with the intent of acting out a play, but that got tossed in favor of using the Shakespeare Insult Kit to come up with inventive and bawdy insults to roast each other. Fun was had by all, but I think next time we’ll have to come up with a more organized plan and maybe get a little more actual learning in. We did have some printable paper dolls and a Globe Theater (and don’t you dare laugh at my little theater – those suckers are harder than they look to put together!!)

CAM02590

CAM02589

CAM02709

Moving on…

October is also when NASA and the Johnson Space Center host their annual Homeschool Day, which is ALWAYS awesome. We had an action-packed day, with classes from 9AM to 3PM. The kids worked on several really cool projects; they built an app for a smartphone, programmed a robot to compete in a mission with other robots, and got to design and 3D-print a keychain with their initials in Morse code. Between classes, we sat in on a STEM presentation, and LBB went through the ‘missions’ in the center of the Space Center’s visitor area. Of all the homeschool day programs, NASA’s is one of the best for kids in middle/high school.
CAM02517

CAM02505

CAM02575

We also had the opportunity to tour our local college campus and spend the day checking out college life.

November:

sertino's social

In November, we had another teen social – this time at a local coffee shop for nerd cards and hanging out like the college klids do. We have a couple of coffeeshops that are the gathering place for teens and various groups in our area. Our local Secular HUmanist group meets here, and NaNoWriMo’s local group as well. It’s a comfy spot with free wifi and the best coffee… what’s not to love?

Other than that, it’s pretty much the same old routine around here. Lately, it feels like we’re just consumed with pre-algebra (which I still hate but am learning to appreciate… begrudgingly). Math continues to be the bane of my very existence. As a homeschooling parent who has issues with certain subjects, it’s really difficult to be conscious of how my attitude towards those subjects can affect my kids’ learning. Math and I just don’t mesh, but so much of that is instinctive, and based in perceived insufficiency that comes from years of poor teaching/poor learning in school. As I go through the lessons to prepare, I have consistently found that, while math is still not my strongest instinctive subject, it’s not anywhere near as difficult or incomprehensible as it’s always seemed in my mind.

I did find a pretty cool project for science – Element Brochures. The boys are still working on their first set, but I made a template that you can use if you’d like to create your own.

Element Brochure template2015

We just had our speech class this month (no pictures), and we’re getting ready for our Thanksgiving Food Drive next week with our homeschool group.

I do have a request for my lovely readers. Yesterday morning, a very dear friend of mine lost her house and everything in it in a fire. She and her partner and their two little girls are currently homeless, relying on the generosity of friends and family for all of their needs right now. Unfortunately, they were not insured, and so getting back on their feet will be a struggle. We’ve created a GoFundMe account for them to help. If you’re in a position to donate, even a dollar, every bit helps. Thank you!! ❤

Happy Thanksgiving!! 🙂  (I know it’s a little early, but who knows when I’ll update next, LOL)
~h

Untitled


Social Studies Club – Holland

2015-09-19_11.12.01

This year, our homeschool group has started a couple of new things that we think are pretty cool. One is the teen social that I wrote about a few weeks ago, and the other is the Social Studies Club. Geared towards upper middle and high schoolers, but open to all ages within our group, it’s organized fairly loosely with a focus on both a project or visual aid and a presentation. Our turnout for this particular class was small, but we had a great afternoon and it was great seeing how much work the kids all put into their projects.

Our collective topic and location was Holland. The kids had pretty much free reign as far as what aspect of the country or how they wanted to develop their topic. I thought that was a great way to set it up, because there are so many different things to cover – it really leaves a lot of room for creativity and individual expression. In addition to their presentations, they also were supposed to come up with and create a visual aid, which could take whatever form they chose.

LBB chose ‘land use in Holland’ as his topic, and created a salt-dough topographical map of Holland. His presentation included an overview of how land is regulated and used, as well as touching on some of the economy and agricultural changes that have happened over the last few years.

CAM02428

PeaGreen chose Vincent Van Gogh as his subject, and re-created ‘The Starry Night‘ for his visual aid. His presentation gave an overview of Van Gogh’s life, but focused mainly on the time period surrounding his stay at the Saint Paul Asylum in Saint Remy-de-Provence. He’s pretty proud of his first attempt at re-creating a work of art!

CAM02427

Among other projects was a ‘newspaper’ filled with an overview of current events in Holland, and a couple of reports on tourism and energy, as well as a history of the Dutch East India Trading Company (VOC) and the integration of Indonesian culture with Dutch culture as a result of the VOC’s presence in Indonesia. I already knew a little bit about it, because the mom who suggested the Social Studies Club mentioned it previously, as it’s her heritage, but it was really neat to hear about in more detail.

To round out the event, each family was tasked with finding and creating country-specific foods for lunch. We brought Ertwensoep or ‘snert’, which is split-pea soup with sausage and potatoes. Our hosts made ‘Macaroni Met Ham En Kaas‘, which is a fancy way to say mac and cheese with ham. She also made *the best* cake… ‘spekkoek‘, which is Thousand Layer Spice Cake. It’s definitely something I want to try, even though it is rather time-consuming (and so very indulgent!!).

Overall, this has been one of the most interesting group projects we’ve done in a while, and we’re looking forward to next month’s class!

Warmly,
~h

 


Science Fair 2015

Once again, it’s science fair season in the homeschool world! It’s odd to me that in our area, the public schools all have their science fairs in the fall, but the homeschooling ones  here are all in the spring. Personally, I prefer that time frame; it seems like the fall is all about getting back into routines and then stalling out for the holidays, but in the spring, there’s tons of time and everything is running smoothly. Maybe that’s just my perception, but I’m glad we get to wait until spring!

This year, our local homeschool group is hosting a non-competitive science fair. We have done competitions in the past, but they’re not really ‘fair’ considering the wide age gap among our students. A non-competitive fair lets everyone participate, with different levels of participation. Some students do the traditional results board outlining their projects, others do their projects and experiments at home and just do a presentation, while others do a family project instead of individual ones. We like the variety and options that this model allows us. We always try to plan our group science fair early so that those who want to go on to compete can participate in the Texas Regional Science Fair in Tomball.

This year, the boys are both doing individual projects, with display boards.

PeaGreen: Hydrophobic Sand

PeaGreen’s project is answering the question, ‘Can you use household products to make hydrophobic sand?’. We saw some on TV and he decided he could make some.

I was pretty happy with his choice, and his enthusiasm for this project. We had some decorative sand from a previous project, so it truly was a ‘household product’ experiment. He chose 6 products to test, and a seventh portion of the sand as the control, including hairspray, WD40, and cooking spray. We made a chart for him to use to test his results, and took lots of pictures.

 

 

CAM01675

LBB: Do Dogs Understand English?

LBB loves his dog, so he’s always on the lookout for something he can do that involves our Max. We came across an interesting premise – that dogs don’t actually understand the words you use, rather, they’re conditioned to tone of voice. So he was all over deciding to test that theory.

My brother and his family recently moved next door to us, bringing their fantastic boxer, June, who has become Max’s very best friend, so LBB had two dogs to test his theory on. He used words that sound similar to commands the dogs already knew, like ‘sit’ and ‘lay’, instead saying ‘spit’ and ‘hit’ and ‘play’ and ‘fray’.  He also tested other words that didn’t sound the same, but said them in the same tone of voice. He was supposed to get pictures, but he had his hands full and it’s been cold out, so this mommy was lazy and didn’t venture out for photography duty (bad mommy).

CAM01676

Our science fair was at a local state park, and we had a really great turn out from our homeschool group!

CAM01681

In other news, my sister has been playing with face-paint quite a bit lately, and convinced the kids to let her do them up, comic-book style. Don’t they look great?! I love that Fred’s tee shirt is in a similar theme.

 

 

CAM01659

Trying to stay warm,

~h