Homeschooling: It's not what we do, it's how we live.

Homeschooling Tips and Tricks

Fall 2015 – Book Club, NASA, Shakespeare and more!

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It seems like I am always playing catch-up, especially when it comes to blogging. I’ve pretty much accepted it, but I always feel guilty when I finally get around to updating. It’s not intentional; I usually start a new post draft for everything I want to write about, only to end up with a bunch of stuff that I decide to condense into one post (like this one) because so much time has passed and making individual posts gets to be a daunting task. One sort-of good thing about the last few months is that I’ve been trying to be more ‘in the moment’ rather than behind the camera, so I don’t have as many pictures of things we’ve been doing as I normally would. As great as I think being part of the moment is, I’ve come to the decision that I regret not having the pictures to preserve the memory, so I’m going back to my normal photo-documenting because that makes me happier. I’d like to say that I ‘learned something’ from this experience, but I don’t think I was ‘addicted to the camera’ in the first place, which is what articles of that kind were targeting. In any case lack of photo evidence does not a clearer schedule make, so let there be words!!

Such is the life of a busy mom, right?
In any case, here’s a snapshot of our life over the last few months:

Once again, our local library system is hosting a book club for homeschoolers. And, once again, after a very strong start, our schedules never manage to sync up with the book club schedule. <sigh> I LOVE the book club format, I really do. I love that our library, and especially our fantastic Librarian, make the effort to host the book club each month for our homeschoolers, and it pains me that we’re never quite able to make it work for us. That said, I snagged a group shot from the introductory meeting in September, which of course I am posting in November, because #reasons (#excuses).


There are actually two clubs; one for kids 5-12, and one for 12+, which is awesome since my kids would hardly sit still for another rendition of ‘Goodnight, Moon’. The meeting format for the older kids involves a list of open questions so the kids can share their thoughts and ideas about the books they chose to read. It’s nice to have that variety, rather than limiting the discussion to a single book, but the format took some getting used to, I’ll admit. After the discussion, there’s usually a game and snacks. The first meeting we did an index card ‘getting to know you’ game. Each card held a topic that you were supposed to fill out; things like: top 5 books, 4 musicians, 4 words that describe me, 4 things I like to do… things like that. Then, it 11058577_10153076466066404_3812504784520512969_nwas trivia time with prizes. PeaGreen points out as I am writing this that he won the most M&Ms that day.

We’re doing the ‘choice of books’ format again this year, rather than the standard single book format, and in addition to the books she chooses for the month the kids can choose any book that’s considered ‘classical literature’, or pick a book from the College Board Reading List, which give them plenty of options. For the first month, the kids chose Treasure Island, which we’re currently reading (since we fell behind). November’s option will be 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – we’re working on Literature, too, so this is a great way to cover both. Treasure Island, is, of course, a classic and filled with swashbuckling adventure. One of my favorite adaptations is Disney’s Treasure Planet, but it’s really quite different, so a comparison will be fun. One of the cool things about reading classics is that the book is available online, through Project Gutenberg, and there are options for study guides and teacher’s guides online. has a Teacher’s Guide for Treasure Island, and Tears of Joy Theater offers a guide for 20,000 Leagues.

We also hit our local JumpingWorldUSA, which is a pretty awesome place. I grew up with a big rectangular trampoline, and my kids had a round one when they were little, but nothing compares to a ROOM full of trampolines – floors made of bounce!! Our JW also has a dodge ball court, which is super cool. The kids always end up sweaty and tired when we leave.


Our homeschool group’s teen social for October was at a local comic book shop, the Book Stan. They set up, and brought in some people to teach the kids how to play Magic: the Gathering, which I thought was pretty cool. The kids have collectively taken to calling it ‘nerd cards’, which I find both funny and appropriate. I got to bee the ‘cool mom’ for a half second, because I used to play and still have a collection of cards from way back in the 90’s (that my kids still can’t have). Their collections quickly surpassed mine though and they’re the experts on ‘nerd cards’ now. In addition to playing cards that they’re collecting, the boys both play Hearthstone, which is an online card game similar (in some ways) to M:tG.

Our homeschool group put together a Shakespeare Party in October, too. The kids made paper dolls with the intent of acting out a play, but that got tossed in favor of using the Shakespeare Insult Kit to come up with inventive and bawdy insults to roast each other. Fun was had by all, but I think next time we’ll have to come up with a more organized plan and maybe get a little more actual learning in. We did have some printable paper dolls and a Globe Theater (and don’t you dare laugh at my little theater – those suckers are harder than they look to put together!!)




Moving on…

October is also when NASA and the Johnson Space Center host their annual Homeschool Day, which is ALWAYS awesome. We had an action-packed day, with classes from 9AM to 3PM. The kids worked on several really cool projects; they built an app for a smartphone, programmed a robot to compete in a mission with other robots, and got to design and 3D-print a keychain with their initials in Morse code. Between classes, we sat in on a STEM presentation, and LBB went through the ‘missions’ in the center of the Space Center’s visitor area. Of all the homeschool day programs, NASA’s is one of the best for kids in middle/high school.



We also had the opportunity to tour our local college campus and spend the day checking out college life.


sertino's social

In November, we had another teen social – this time at a local coffee shop for nerd cards and hanging out like the college klids do. We have a couple of coffeeshops that are the gathering place for teens and various groups in our area. Our local Secular HUmanist group meets here, and NaNoWriMo’s local group as well. It’s a comfy spot with free wifi and the best coffee… what’s not to love?

Other than that, it’s pretty much the same old routine around here. Lately, it feels like we’re just consumed with pre-algebra (which I still hate but am learning to appreciate… begrudgingly). Math continues to be the bane of my very existence. As a homeschooling parent who has issues with certain subjects, it’s really difficult to be conscious of how my attitude towards those subjects can affect my kids’ learning. Math and I just don’t mesh, but so much of that is instinctive, and based in perceived insufficiency that comes from years of poor teaching/poor learning in school. As I go through the lessons to prepare, I have consistently found that, while math is still not my strongest instinctive subject, it’s not anywhere near as difficult or incomprehensible as it’s always seemed in my mind.

I did find a pretty cool project for science – Element Brochures. The boys are still working on their first set, but I made a template that you can use if you’d like to create your own.

Element Brochure template2015

We just had our speech class this month (no pictures), and we’re getting ready for our Thanksgiving Food Drive next week with our homeschool group.

I do have a request for my lovely readers. Yesterday morning, a very dear friend of mine lost her house and everything in it in a fire. She and her partner and their two little girls are currently homeless, relying on the generosity of friends and family for all of their needs right now. Unfortunately, they were not insured, and so getting back on their feet will be a struggle. We’ve created a GoFundMe account for them to help. If you’re in a position to donate, even a dollar, every bit helps. Thank you!! <3

Happy Thanksgiving!! :)  (I know it’s a little early, but who knows when I’ll update next, LOL)


Summer 2015 Recap



Looking back, it occurs to me that I haven’t been very good at updating this year. Summer has gone by in a whirlwind, and that doesn’t always leave time for blogging. So I thought I’d do a re-cap. I see abandoned blogs all the time, and though I understand how life gets in the way, it’s always sad to see a blog just kind of stop. Rest assured, that’s not what’s happening here – it may take a while, but I usually do come back and update! We’re still here; we’re still homeschooling.

The last real update was in March, with our homeschool group’s science fair. The kids worked hard on their projects, and it was a lot of fun to put together and participate in. That was our group’s biggest science fair to date, which was awesome. Our homeschool group usually meets every week, but this summer was so incredibly hot that a lot of our usual events (like the talent show) that normally take place outside got canceled with plans to reschedule when the weather was cooler. That left us with a lot of free time, which we put to good use!


Our group chooses a charity organization to work with each year. It’s somewhat difficult to fin organizations that will work with kids; most places (for liability reasons) want volunteers to be 16 or 18 to work with them. We’ve been fortunate in that many of the organizations we’ve approached have worked with us to find ways that our kids can help without violating their guidelines. Habitat for Humanity is one that we very much enjoyed working with this year – not only because it exposed the kids to seeing how much progress a group could make in a short amount of time, but also for the fellowship and diversity of the volunteers. Our kids weren’t allowed to work on-site; in fact for safety, while we were there, no work could be done at all while our students were on the property. Our kids got to help serve lunch and visit with the volunteers while they took their lunch break.

may 19 2015

Here’s another, with actual blue sky peeking through.  friend of ours snagged this and applied some filters to it that made our beach look much prettier than it really is!


This is from the Galveston Pleasure Pier’s Homeschool Day. We met some friends that we haven’t seen in a while and the kids had a blast!


Here’s a shot of some of the teens from our homeschool group. We’ve had an influx of older kids this year, which is nice. Most homeschoolers ted to either phase out for high school, or stop coming because many groups tend to focus on the younger years. We plan to homeschool throughout high school, so having a group of older kids definitely helps with social time.


Beach again!


Being in Texas, summer isn’t complete without a crawfish boil! Our friends celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary with lots of mudbugs and tasty beer. The kids ‘rescued’ some of the creepy-crawlers (at least until it came time to cook ’em!!) and went fishing.


This is probably the most ‘formal’ picture we’ll ever have – Loverly Husband and I were in a wedding over the summer and so we all got dressed up.


4th of July! The happily wedded couple from above is in the center. Our Independence Day celebration was more modest this year than in previous years, but many fireworks were set off and much fun was had!


You know what makes a ‘slip-n-slide’ even better? BUBBLES! My brother-in-law rigged up a foam machine and we took it to the country for an evening out. By the time we were finished, the entire yard was a foot deep in foam!


This was a good summer for the lake, too – we went to visit some friends and spent a day on the water in late July.


The first Saturday in August is another ‘family tradition’ – our annual canoe trip.


Our homeschool group has hosted a public speaking group class every month for the summer (with plans to continue this school year). A couple of kids are missing, but this is our most recent group picture!

We actually didn’t take a long summer break this year. We had a lot of wedding stuff mid-summer, so we did take a couple of weeks off around that time, but overall, we’ve been hitting the books pretty regularly all year. I did post a ‘back to school’ previously, so we’re already well into our first semester of the new school year, but it’s so hard to say exactly ‘when’ it started because there isn’t really a break that defines it. It’s taken me a long time to learn to be okay with that ambiguity.

Hope your summer was fantastic!

The Homeschooling Spectrum

10526176_10152691965351404_1599779552232524066_n If you’re new to homeschooling, you may not realize just how diverse the concept of ‘homeschooling’ can be. This graphic has been popping up on homeschooling boards fairly often lately, and I wanted to share it and talk a bit about it, because I think it is a relatively decent simple breakdown of what homeschooling might look like for individual families.

No two homeschooling families will look exactly alike, even if they’re using the same materials. That whole concept is kind of weird, because schools do look very similar, no matter where you’re at geographically, or what age your kids are, or what materials they’re using. In fact, even with completely different materials, ‘school’ in a brick-and-mortar school often looks practically identical to another B&M school. This generalization excludes ‘alternative’ schools like Montessori, Waldorf and others, which are based in different educational philosophies (in fact, many homeschooling families base their methods on similar concepts), but overall, ‘public’ schools look very, very similar.

I’ve been wanting to talk about the difference between homeschooling and ‘school at home’, which is the Red section on the chart, and encompasses things like ‘virtual academies’ that are hosted by states or local ISDs. I may rustle some feathers for saying this, but if you’re Red, then you’re not really ‘homeschooling’. Hear me out – what I mean by that is that you’re missing out on the entire point of being outside the B&M structure of/and traditional education model. Yes, you might be at home, but you’re still dealing with much of the same stress and hassle of B&M schooling, and getting none of the freedom and enjoyment of ‘real’ homeschooling. Not to mention that in some ways, you’re still buying into the ideas that traditional education have drilled into our culture (like testing and grades and grade-levels, rather than focusing on mastery before progressing).

Having said that, Red isn’t all bad. Red has its place in the homeschooling spectrum, and isn’t without advantages. Red can be a necessary stepping stone towards ideas that more fully encompass what homeschooling can really be like. Red is safe, and provides a lot of structure and reassurance for newbie homeschoolers who are hesitant to take the leap into full-on homeschooling. Red is awesome for kids who need to be outside of the classroom but have parents who genuinely don’t want to homeschool, and for kids who just need a lot of structure. Red is a good option for families who live in areas where there is a lack of support for homeschooling in general. Red is also great for families who encounter a lot of opposition from extended family or friends, or for those who know their own strengths and weaknesses, and despite a genuine desire to be otherwise, know that without such a strict outside structure they would end up ‘not schooling’. And then there are some families who choose Red because that’s what they’re comfortable with, and that’s cool, too.

Orange is pretty similar to Red; I don’t see a lot of difference between the two, really. Maybe the difference is more a mental shift than a visible one. That’s actually a pretty big deal. That’s the first step towards stepping outside the box. Even if it doesn’t show in your day-to-day schooling interactions with your kids, that switch in thinking is key if you want to move into a different color. It can be as simple as switching to a 4 day school week, or starting at 10AM instead of 8. Small steps, but important ones!

Yellow is pretty much the middle. Yellow is still parent-led, which is great for young children who are coming out of B&M schools who are used to a lot of direction, or for children who started out in Indigo or Purple and Mom feels like it’s time to add some structure. Yellow is great for socially active homeschool group participation, and for control-freak parents (like me). We started out in Yellow, and it was a really good place for us when we were there. Yellow requires a bit more parental prep, because you’re not necessarily using a boxed curriculum – you may be researching different resources to use for different subjects, and it takes time to plan. But overall, Yellow is a nice ‘middle of the road’ option.

Green and blue kind of go together in my mind, probably because that’s where we are now. We do a lot of field trips, some project-based learning, a lot of note/lap-booking, and still use some structured curriculum. But we also have more child-led learning (interest-based) than we used to because since my kids are older now, we’re tailoring to career paths and personal interests. We have a lot of flexibility with scheduling, and I trust my kids to do what they need to. For us, this was a system of more parental control, lessened as their responsibility grows. It might look much different for another family.

Indigo and Purple also merge together for me, but that’s very likely because I don’t have a lot of experience with them and have a hard time differentiating between the two. I’ve seen Indigo and Purple very well done, and I’ve seen it as an excuse for no schooling at all. I’m sure that colors my perception of child-led learning (or delight-led) and unschooling (which is what those colors represent) in practice, but I know that it can be a very good option for some kids/families. I’m Unschooled. Yes, I can Write is a blog that I’ve been following for years, and she’s a great example (and advocate) of unschooling as a successful model of education. I also have a couple of friends who successfully employed unschooling, and have seen it work (for both young children and teens/young adults).

I absolutely don’t want to give the impression that the chart is a ladder of sorts that people work their way from Red to Violet – it’s not about that at all. But stepping outside of the Red zone, even into Orange or Yellow, is so liberating! I’m sure people who are in the indigo/violet area would say the same thing to someone like me; it’s all about perspective!

Like I said, we started out in yellow, and have moved into the green/blue area. I am deeply attracted to indigo & violet, but feel equally like I know that they just won’t work for us and am afraid/lack faith or trust in the process. I generally need more structure than that, and I feel like my kids need more direction than those areas provide. I fully reserve the right to change my mind about that, but that’s how I feel right now. The truth is, green/blue is comfortable to me. I don’t feel the need to change it, because it works for us. We still get a ‘backbone’ for things to hinge on, but we also have a lot of freedom. And with my unpredictable work schedule, green/blue lets me work without feeling like I am sacrificing school in the process.

Ultimately, it’s up to each family to figure out where they fall in the spectrum (or, for that matter, if they want to let something like ‘the spectrum’ define them). Many families start out in one color and move to another, either gradually or by circumstance or by deliberate choice. Some families move down the spectrum, while others move up it. Homeschooling is such an individual thing – some families use one method with one kid and another method with their other child(ren).

However you choose to homeschool, make the most of it! Spend time with your kids, stop and see the sights in your town that you have never had time for… make the most out of the time you have with them. It goes by *so* fast! Enjoy it.







Penmanship & Writing Helpers

Handwriting is one of those things that I’ve gone round and round with my kids over, for basically the entire time we’ve been homeschooling. It’s not that they aren’t capable of writing neatly; more that they get in a hurry and rush through it. I’m a stickler for legibility, and we focus pretty heavily on writing, especially now that they’re in middle school, so I really do need it to be a skill they master.

Over the years, we’ve tried various methods for improving penmanship, none being particularly helpful (other than the old standard of ‘practice, practice’ practice’). We’ve gone through 2 workbooks of Handwriting Without Tears, tried pre-writing hand warm-up exercises, ‘ZOOM‘ technique, and used tons of practice worksheets, used grid paper and Mead’s Redi-Space notebooks, tried note-taking in various forms – I think we’ve done fairly well at ferreting out all of the tricks of the trade, and to give credit where credit is due, all of these things have helped. I have definitely seen improvements – vast improvements over when we first started – but nothing that is an ‘a-ha! moment’ where it just ‘clicks’ for them. But homeschooling is nothing if not try, try, try again, and so the search continues. I found something new that I will be implementing with the boys when we start again in January and I thought I’d share.

It is actually an idea that I found in a video, from a Pinterest pin on writing and hand-lettering for art journal purposes. The video used Photoshop and a purchased font to create what is essentially a worksheet for the author to print and trace in order to learn a new style of hand-lettering. But I thought the same technique would work well for improving handwriting (only simplified quite a bit). For example, you can create a new MSWord.docx or other word processing program and use a very light font color. That would be the easiest way to achieve the same effect.

font worksheet
What you end up with is a page they can trace over. This picture is a sample of what that can look like; for ‘real’ use, I’d probably either type it or have them type it first, then trace. The font in this sample page is called Architect’s Daughter, and I downloaded it from (free for personal use). I also like a script font called Gruenewald VA – it is visually similar to what my boys are used to from HWT.

The reason I an sharing this is because I wanted to reassure other moms with older homeschooled kids (especially boys) out there that you’re not the only ones that struggle with legible handwriting! It’s something I am constantly harping on. If you’ve read here before, I often refer to myself as a ‘mean’ homeschooling mom, because I do make my kids erase and re-write thing that are hard to read. Our rule is, ‘If I can’t read it, I can’t assess your progress; ergo, you must re-write it’. Also, “Mom’s not going to go blind trying to decode these marks into words. Just NO.” And, “Are these words?!? In English??” and “Are you kidding me??? O_o” Sometimes, I change the wording.

In any case, I have dreams of one day having beautifully hand-written notebooks from my kids, but for now, I will settle for ‘legible’ and call it progress well-done!

Care to share your tips for handwriting help?



Go With The Flow

When it comes to establishing habits and patterns in your life, experts will say that you have to do it consistently for anywhere from 2 weeks to one month for it to become your new normal. While there may be some grain of truth to that, I think there’s more to it than just committing to something new for a while and expecting the new thing(s) to magically become ‘how you are’. Particularly  when it comes to making changes to habits that you’re pre-disposed to having or that you’ve had for years, or doing something totally new in your life that also works against your nature.

For example, homeschooling.

For many of us, taking on the full responsibility of educating our kids is a new thing. If you had a child in school, then going from being the mom who gets the kids up, fed, packed and out the door to school everyday, to being the parent who gets to revel in the first (or third) cuppa long before the kids get out of bed seems like a luxury. And it is, don’t get me wrong! But all too easily, in even the strictest of homeschooling homes, ‘relaxing’ can go too far. To be fair, so can rigidity – but this post isn’t really about how relaxed or rigid your homeschooling style is. It’s about moving from your reality to a space that is more in line with your ideal (provided your ideal is at least somewhat realistic).

Lots of parents, when they first start homeschooling, have this vision of educational perfection in their heads. I am not excluded from this misty-eyed vision of homeschool naiveté; it’s such a great fantasy! But that fantasy rarely takes into account your level of introductory excitement vs. your maintained enthusiasm. It also rarely takes into account the family’s routines and patterns.

‘What is she talking about?!’, you’re probably wondering. Hang in there – I’m getting to the point, I promise!

So, as a new homeschooling parent, you may have this vision of greeting the sun, coffee in hand, with snuggly children all around you. The sun rises, the birds sing, the children yawn and stretch and get ready for the day. While you gather your materials, they brush teeth and finish breakfast and everyone gathers at your knee to  start their daily lessons, while you (indulgently) pat them on the head and offer gentle re-directions and instructions as needed. The little darlings are blissed out, understanding their privileged state of learning at home, and showing deep respect and appreciation for the time and effort that their dear mother puts into finding the right curriculum and materials and blah, blah, blah… you get the picture.

Only to find out, disturbingly, that instead of this beautiful fantasy, you end up with a life that looks more like the after picture in this equation and wondering what the heck you did wrong.


So what’s the trick? How do you go from your frazzled reality to a more peaceful new world? More importantly, how do you get started in such a way that you don’t automatically fail after a week?

The answer to both questions is ‘go with the flow’. What I mean by that, is to plan on a routine or schedule that flows within your already established patterns. If you’re not a morning person, then creating a schedule that requires you to be up with the sun is probably not going to be realistic. It’s easy to plan on paper – but when we have an ideal that doesn’t reflect the reality of our lives, instead of making adjustments and keeping that momentum going, all too often, we chalk it up to failure and nothing gets done that day….or week, or month. While ‘try again tomorrow’ is a good theory, it only works if tomorrow’s plan is better than today’s, and being creatures of habit, we rarely take the time to analyze what went wrong today and make changes (that we implement) for tomorrow.  

If your patterns run toward more productivity in the afternoon, it may be wise to schedule a lazier morning and have your more in-depth studies later in the day. However, if you notice that your precious little darlings work better in the mornings, it may be necessary to work towards making an earlier start. This may take some time to accomplish, but it’s worth it if it’s what your kids need.

I notice that, in my family, none of us are ‘morning people’, however when it comes to schoolwork, if we are up by 8AM and start school by 9AM, the day seems to be more productive overall. If we wait until 10 or 11 to get started, then it’s like pulling teeth all day to get their work accomplished. This sucks for me, because I could win sleep marathons if there was such a thing; no time is better for sleeping, in my opinion, than between 4AM and 11AM. MY most productive time is typically between about 11PM and 2AM. But my kids are not that way, so I’ve had to make adjustments to ensure that we get at least a couple of days during the week where we are up early and working earlier in the day.

So how do you make those changes? Small steps add up to big ones. Start small – it may be a matter of slowly adjusting your schedule over the course of weeks or months to get where you want to be. You could take a different approach and designate one or two days as ‘this’ schedule, and one or two days as ‘that’ schedule. We tend to take the second approach; one day home, one day out. One day early, one day later. It works for us because it doesn’t require the odious task of making a permanent change that contradicts my personal needs (or desires, if you wanna get technical about it. Habits… how’s that?).

Another facet of ‘going with the flow’ is your ability to put in the time and effort – meaning, in short, homeschooling is hard. And time-consuming. And HARD for the parent. It’s much more-so if you choose to construct your syllabus, rather than rely on a boxed curriculum. Much of your free time is eaten up with school planning and studying so that you can provide for your kids. Realistically, after a couple of years, that gets old. Your eventual need for a break can outweigh your intent, and there’s no shame in acknowledging that. Implementing a change that helps the situation is better than dealing with burnout (which can last a long time).

I’m talking about getting help with school. If you can outsource in any way – whether that’s just having Dad (or Mom if you’re a homeschooling Pop), or Grandma or Grandpa or a homeschooling friend or co-op or community lessons or a tutoring center … if you can lighten your load, then don’t be afraid to take advantage of those resources. Some of them are costly, and for many (us, included) that takes them off the table – but some solutions just take effort to implement! A mini-co-op, for example: choose one or two days a week and one or two friends who have strengths in subjects you’re weaker in and school together. There are many free online resources that can lighten your load as well.

This year is the first year that I am out-sourcing some of the kids’ work – and ‘lo, it is *glorious*.  Math is not my favorite subject, and it’s my weakest subject, both for my own skills and my ability and confidence to teach, so we outsourced it this year. Having Maths off my plate to plan and teach has relived SO MUCH of my stress – I can’t even tell you. I’m not totally un-involved; we’re using Khan Academy, and we all have accounts. I ‘play’ too, and we compete. I brush up on my skills, learn new things, have my finger on the pulse of their lesson and it’s fun, too. But being able to oversee, rather than instruct has made this year so much more enjoyable for me (and less stressful).

Another way to ‘go with the flow’ involves maintaining the connection and relationship and communication you have with your child(ren). Successful homeschooling is a two-way street; it involves the kids just as much as the parents. Some days, the vibe is just ‘off’ and as any seasoned homeschooling parent can tell you, it’s far better to reschedule the day than it is to try to force something that’s going to make everyone miserable. I tend to build in ‘slacker’ days on our schedule so that we can either take that day with a lighter load, or play catch up if we needed that slack earlier. It all evens out in the end, and makes for much more harmonious days as we go.

So what are your tips and tricks for ‘going withe the flow’?

Halloween Fun










Halloween really is my favorite time of year. Unfortunately, this Halloween has sucked, because we’ve all been sick. We never get sick – like, seriously – NEVER. But this year, PeaGreen got a cold, then Loverly Husband had the flu, and LBB and I both have been feeling off-and-on sickly for the past couple of weeks. I’ve felt so drained and not holiday-spirit-ish that I didn’t even decorate the house for Halloween like I normally do. Boo to that (and not in the fun, scary way).

We did have some friends over for pumpkin carving though. Much fun was had by all:

Costuming went well; well enough, anyway. I think the kids are kinda getting out of the ‘let’s dress up’ phase and into the ‘I want to look cool’ phase. There are some aspects of growing up that aren’t worth it, I think. But they did turn out rather well, despite the last-minute-ness of it all. Our homeschool group had their Halloween party this week, and so that’s where the bulk of our costume effort went. We had company all Friday afternoon, and neither LBB or I felt up to ToT’ing, so we ended up grabbing pizza and bags of candy from the store and staying in to watch a scary movie this year (Cabin in the Woods, if you must know). CAM00907

Other than Halloween mini-goodness, we’ve been hard at work on the school front as well. I started making up a list of all their work for the week and giving it to them on Mondays, with more freedom to choose the order they want to work in. If they want to work ahead, that’s their call (though the must finish the day’s assignments each day).

I know there’s a lot of debate about this, and we’ve taken a long time to finally decide if it was right for us, but we attached monetary incentive to their work (both schoolwork and chores).  Overall, our kids are pretty fortunate/spoiled – they have always had chores to do (which they have to do as part of their contribution to our family), and when they want something, we pretty much buy it for them or give it to them. But lately, they’ve been asking for either money, or larger things that we don’t necessarily want to spend money on. So after much thought, we decided that a job well-done is worth rewarding. For schoolwork, we decided on 10 cents per completed assignment, plus $1 per day for completed chores, and instituted a savings plan on money earned. They put a minimum of 20% in their primary saving account (which we match), a minimum of 10% in their secondary savings (which is a shadow box frame with a picture of an item they are saving for, and a dollar amount to reach before they’re allowed to open it), and a minimum of 5% to be donated to a charity (or put in savings towards a larger donation later in the year).

We’ve been doing this for a couple of weeks now, and it’s been interesting to see how they feel about it and how it’s affected their willingness to work, and has brought into question ‘work for reward’ and all that jazz. Interestingly enough, it hasn’t really affected their willingness to work all that much, either on school assignments or chores. They are still required to do their same lessons, and same chores, and *if* they complete them, they earn their money. If they don’t, then they still have to complete the lesson/chore, but haven’t earned their money. The good thing (for me, at least) is that they’re not constantly asking *me* to buy them things, which is awesome.

Another thing we’ve been working on again pretty hard-core is labooking. We were pretty gung-ho about it for a while, but then kinda slacked off because it seemed too ‘young’. After the workshop at NASA, and taking a look at some of TheBusyMom’s lapbooks, I got inspired, and took out some of the older lapbooks we started but never finished and have been working on them again. I also helped the boys start new ones, lapbooking their research project instead of writing it all out in a form like we had been. They are enjoying it – maybe just for the switch in format if nothing else. For my own assignment, I’m working on a lapbook for the Waverly Hills Sanitorium, which is one of my favorite places to read about. I haven’t been, but I plan to go one day!

I will post each book on my ‘Lapbooks’ page, and on its own page with links when they’re finished, but I wanted to give you a sneak-peek.

Something I also wanted to mention is that we’ve been schooling pretty consistently now since mid-August. Normally, we school for 4 weeks, then take a week-long break, then repeat. After about 4 weeks, we all seem to lose focus, and get grouchy and tired, and the week break is revitalizing and gets us back on track. This is the first time since we started homeschooling that we’ve gone this long without a break, and I am pretty impressed with that! I don’t know if it’s because we took a longer break during the summer, or if the boys are just older and better able to concentrate/focus for a longer period of time, but I am pretty thrilled with it. We have another 4 weeks to go and we’ll break for December (at least that’s the plan now – we may school into December this year). That puts us ahead of schedule for the school year, which is great.

Till next time!




Fall Update


The last couple of weeks, I’ve made some changes to how I am assigning the boys their work. We’ve tried using various methods (workboxes, STARS journals, various binders and lists, to name a few), but nothing has really stuck. Partially, I think I was pushing too hard for too much independence before they were ready, but now that they’re older, we’re trying some more self-paced scheduling.

Last week, I printed their assignments and gave the pages to the boys and allowed them to work at their own pace. Loverly Husband was off Friday (home DIY-ness related), so the understanding was that if they got all their work accomplished for the week before Friday, they could have Friday off. While they didn’t quite hit that goal, overall, this method was successful, so we’re trying it again this week.

I usually plan 3-4 weeks at a time, but having them knowing what’s on the schedule for the week is nice. In the past, LBB especially, has gotten overwhelmed with seeing everything laid out, but he’s able to focus on one day at a time and work neatly with the week’s schedule (thank goodness!!) – that’s an ADHD/anxiety success!

In other news, we’ve been busy with our homeschool group – the Houston Children’s Museum held their homeschool day a couple of weeks ago, and we had a great time! They have this child-sized city called ‘Kidtropolis‘ that has samples of real life – all kinds of jobs, including: a TV station, a postal service, a bank, a grocery store, city hall, police/fire/EMS, restaurant, vet – the kids can ‘work’ and get ‘paid’, make deposits at the bank, ‘buy’ things at the store, change jobs… it’s really neat. This was the first time that either of my kids really made an effort to experience it. LBB started working in the restaurant, and was eventually promoted to manager. It was fun watching him ‘work’ with all the other kids.

We also dabbled in some folk art while out at the park. The kids used glue and paints to faux-batik pillowcases. PeaGreen was pretty happy with his rendition of Link from Legend of Zelda, while LBB was less enthused about the entire project. Still, he managed a decent representation of the Destiny logo.


We’ve been using Khan Academy for math, and after some initial trepidation, we’ve established a routine with it and it’s working well. Basically, the boys are ‘learning’ each new concept by watching the video. Then working through the ‘practice’ sessions, and then competing each section with a ‘mastery challenge’. Questions and concepts do come back up even though they’ve mastered them, so it’s keeping skills in the rotation, which is nice. The boys are spending about 5 hours per week on math, which is good at this stage. It was taking them a bit longer, but they’ve gotten the hang of doing it this way now, and it’s nice. I love that I am not having to ‘teach’ it – when they get stuck, we watch the video together (because I am often just as lost as they are), so we talk it out and work through the problems together, then they continue working on their own.

I think that having such a central subject taken off of my plate has helped me get a handle on things. I’ve been feeling a little overwhelmed with middle school curriculum – math is so not my area of expertise, so being able to pass that off to more qualified ‘teachers’ is awesome. Plus, I think that it’s helped the boys be more independent and not rely so much on me.



Last but not least, this is the boys’ new bathroom! Loverly Husband spent this weekend ripping out the floor and walls and replacing everything from sub-flooring to fixtures. We had bathroom wallboard in there, but it wasn’t sealed very well, so water has been seeping behind it, and rotted out the floor and a lot of the wood underneath the wallboard. It was totally nasty in there. But thanks to all his hard work, it looks great! We bought a new shower curtain and will be painting soon and it will be all done. I absolutely could not be happier that the floor and bathtub surround are done though.








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